MEASURES LIBRARY

Design, Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation Model (DIME)

The DIME model is a process developed and used by the Applied Mental Health Research Group at Johns Hopkins University since 2000. The model seeks to combine evidence-based programming with rigorous monitoring and impact evaluation. It demonstrates the potential of using qualitative, participative research to inform the development of quantitative measures of mental health and psychosocial well-being. A manual is available which specifies the key steps specified by the DIME model. These steps are: (1) Qualitative assessment to identify and describe priority mental health and psychosocial problems; (2) Development of draft instruments to assess priority mental health and psychosocial problems; (3) Validation of draft instrument(s); (4) Conduct baseline prevalence surveys; (5) Program planning; (6) Development of interventions to address the identified mental health and psychosocial problems; (7) Implementation and monitoring; (8) Intervention evaluation. DIME is thus an approach to program development not just an approach to assessment and evaluation. However, there is potential to use aspects of the approach without committing to the whole DIME cycle.

Related Publications

Jordans M. J., Tol W. A., Susanty D., Ntamatumba P., Luitel N. P., Komproe I. H., & De Jong J. T. (2013). Implementation of a mental health care package for children in areas of armed conflict: a case study from Burundi, Indonesia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Sudan. PLoS Med, 10(1).

Bass, J., Pudyal, B., Tol, W., Murray, L., Nadison, M., & Bolton, P. (2012). A controlled trial of problem-solving counseling for war-affected adults in Aceh, Indonesia. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 47(2), 279-291.

Betancourt, T., Bass, J., Borisova, I., Neugebauer, R., Speelman, L., Onyango, G., & Bolton, P. (2009). Measuring local instrument validity and reliability: A field-based example from northern Uganda. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 44(8), 685-92.

What it measures

Pyschosocial and emotional wellbeing

Developer

Applied Mental Health Research Group at Johns Hopkins
University

Population

General

Source

Language

English

Region

Cost

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